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January 19, 2012
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SdKfz Quad Convert by Rob-Cavanna SdKfz Quad Convert by Rob-Cavanna
3D Sketchup model by Todd Norton :iconltla9000311:
See his original submission here: [link]

I added only the presentation graphics + minor PS retouching

Map of Poland from here: [link]

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The SdKfz 222 was a real armored car used by the German Army in WWII. Another example of German weapons which looked far too futuristic for the late 1930s. In the mech infested battlefields of Operation Dragon Slayer, engineers have cleverly exchanged the wheels for a 4-legged mobility system.

For those interested in the actual history of the original armored car, here is what wikipedia has to tell you:

The Leichter Panzerspähwagen (German: roughly "Light Armoured Reconnaissance Vehicle") were a series of light four-wheel drive armoured cars produced by Nazi Germany from 1935 to 1944.
They were developed by Eisenwerk Weserhütte of Bad Oeynhausen. Chassis were built by Auto Union in Zwickau and assembled by F. Schichau of Elbing and Maschinenfabrik Niedersachsen in Hanover-Linden.
It used the chassis of the standard sPkw I Horch 801 (heavy car) with an angled armoured body and turret.
The rear mounted engine was a 67 kW (90 hp) Horch 3.5 petrol engine, giving it a road speed of 80 km/h (50 mph) and a cross-country speed of 40 km/h (25 mph). It had a maximum range of 300 km (186 mi).
Used by the reconnaissance battalions (Aufklärungs-Abteilung) of the Panzer divisions, the type performed well enough in countries with good road networks, like those in Western Europe. However, on the Eastern Front and North Africa, this class of vehicle was hampered by its relatively poor off-road performance. In those theaters, it gradually found itself replaced in the reconnaissance role by the Sdkfz 250 half-track. The Sdkfz 250/9 was the Sdkfz 250 with the same turret as the Sdfkz 222.
The Sdkfz 222 was examined by Soviet designers before they created the similar BA-64 light armoured car.
Front and sides were made of 8 mm (0.3 in) steel; thinner 5 mm (0.2 in) plates protected the top, rear, and bottom. Cast vision ports later replaced ports cut into the armour. The open topped turret was fitted with wire mesh anti-grenade screens.
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:icongrahamberad:
GrahamBeRad Featured By Owner Jul 22, 2014  Professional Writer
Excellent work. 
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:iconseekaz:
SeeKaz Featured By Owner Sep 1, 2013
great
Reply
:iconcodyfurlong:
CodyFurlong Featured By Owner Mar 14, 2013
Very nice, reminds me of a German tank I used to play on game.
Reply
:iconherr-crouch:
Herr-Crouch Featured By Owner Dec 5, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
This.... there's too much win here. :O

I love the design!
Reply
:iconhexidextrous:
Hexidextrous Featured By Owner Oct 15, 2012
Ever seen the anime, Strike Witches?
Because this looks a lot like a vehicle I'd see in Strike Witches, especially one of the many ones that were Infected by the Neuroi in it.
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:iconenc86:
enc86 Featured By Owner Jun 5, 2012
hell yea, thats awesome!
Reply
:iconmitch3482:
mitch3482 Featured By Owner May 15, 2012
Ladies and gentlemen, the craziest piece of #$@% from a military ever!
Reply
:icondru-zod:
Dru-Zod Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2012
Nice recon mecha
Reply
:iconrob-cavanna:
Rob-Cavanna Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2012
:thanks:
Reply
:iconwastelander7:
Wastelander7 Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2012
Very cool stuff! (as always guys!) Like the basket on the side between the legs. Looks a little less vulnerable than the Dingo to MG fire because of the sloped surfaces. The gunner might be a bit vulnerable with nothing but steel mesh cowling's, but, if they can keep the enemy from zeroing the upper turret by keeping moving, it would go a long way toward helping the gunner live. And would make sniping difficult. (bullets are easily deflected, as every sniper would know) On the other hand, in the desert, it would give them some shade while letting the head out of the cabin, which would be a plus.

I can see it wading through infantry fire on the Russian front hoping to clear the position before the tanks come up!

I say again, gentlemen, you're doing a great job!
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