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July 9, 2010
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"Big Tojo"  -Rough concept by Rob-Cavanna "Big Tojo"  -Rough concept by Rob-Cavanna
Early pass at a Japanese mech for Operation Dragon Slayer: [link]

Based on a rough sketchup model by :iconflaketom:

Chest section on front view is stolen from a Kyugo tank schematic. From somewhere on the interweb. No ball bustin' please, it's just rough sketchin.
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:iconbobdd0:
bobdd0 Featured By Owner Sep 9, 2010
ha, sweet. i wanna see a banzii crage of these guys.
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:iconsabahn:
SABAHN Featured By Owner Jul 10, 2010  Student Filmographer
The size of the gun suggests it's best suited to anti-infantry combat.
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:iconrob-cavanna:
Rob-Cavanna Featured By Owner Jul 10, 2010
Same 6.5mm MG mounted in the hull of a Kyugo tank. Yes, for anti-infantry use.
But he can carry larger anti-tank weapons, or others, in his hands. Sword, flame thrower, anti-aircraft guns, whatever is needed.
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:iconsabahn:
SABAHN Featured By Owner Jul 10, 2010  Student Filmographer
A giant sword as a mech weapon? I'd quite like to see how that would work in this particular combat era.
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:iconrob-cavanna:
Rob-Cavanna Featured By Owner Jul 10, 2010
Just think about your usual mech-centric franchise; front mission, patlabor, gundam; you see all sorts of hand-held weapon options. The projectile weapons mostly use shell sizes standard to the era, but in terms of close-combat melee weapons, it's wide open for possibility and improvisation; knuckledusters, axes, combat blades, claws, etc...

Looky here: [link] You may see a club rendered from a busted 88mm cannon (to be filled w/ concrete, welded w/ metal shards, and wrapped in barbed wire by engineers). My clever collaborator also came up w/ a brilliantly simple weapon; a drive sprocket connected to a chain. Perfect medieval style flail weapon.

The WWII mechs aren't that agile, not compared to their aforementioned modern brethren, but they wouldn't have to be, relying mostly on sheer force. Like wrecking balls. Just think; one solid blow to a tank's tracks, a cannon barrel, or another mech's sensitive spots; muffler, exposed joints, head mounted optics, etc... would be quite effective. Melee weapons are relatively easy to produce and they never run out of ammo, so yeah, they're in the game. Even better, w/ such items as the Katana, they reinforce a sense of national identity, and distinguish the particular model as having a specific cultural origin.
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:iconsabahn:
SABAHN Featured By Owner Jul 11, 2010  Student Filmographer
That makes a lot of sense. You could even use bits of destroyed vehicles as melee weaponry, or fix bits together to upgrade that 'weaponry'.
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:iconrob-cavanna:
Rob-Cavanna Featured By Owner Jul 11, 2010
Right on. The hood of a blown up deuce-and-a-half could become an impromptu shield. Or the shurzen (armor skirt) from a Panzer IV.
As far as combining goes... we did a lot of hand-held cannons w/ co-axial MGs, as you'd see on a real tank turret. Flammenwerfer + MG, etc... Also have a flak gun + IF searchlight combo.

I always thought it was cool (despite my general feeling on the war) when soldiers in Iraq made that 'Mad-Max' shop to upgrade Hummers -adding extra armor, turrets and so forth. But this sort of improv engineering has been going on in the military forever. That's sort of the idea behind that Bigfooted Jeep I did: hedgecutter from a Sherman, wheels from a Brit Armored Car, extra armor from a halftrack... upgrades don't always come from a factory.
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:iconsabahn:
SABAHN Featured By Owner Jul 11, 2010  Student Filmographer
Well said!
When the chips are down, and your running out of luck;
you can always MacGuyver yourself out of the situation!
That aside, fear breeds hard work and originality -in
most cases- so you'll usually end up -on the battlefield-
creating something both useful, and unknown to enemy troops.
Ambush factor +1, to put it simply :U
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:iconotakubouzu:
OtakuBouzu Featured By Owner Jul 9, 2010  Professional General Artist
Sorry, i chuckled a bit from the name.

So... is 'big tojo' it's actual name or just reporting name assigned bt allies?
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:iconrob-cavanna:
Rob-Cavanna Featured By Owner Jul 9, 2010
All good. It's meant to be very tongue in cheek.

Definitely a nickname given to it by US GIs... in keeping w/ all the nicknames given to this series of WWII mecha: Big Joe (US), Big Tom (UK), Big Ivan, Big Fritz... you get the idea. Seems very likely such monickers would arise if these things existed. Typical of that generation's sense of humor, I think.

It'll get a proper Japanese name and numerical designation as the design itself gets ironed out! :D
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